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147 Practical Tips for Teaching Sustainability:
Connecting the Environment, the Economy, and Society (2nd Ed.)

By William M. Timpson, Brian Dunbar, Gailmarie Kimmel, Brett Bruyere, Peter Newman, Hillary Mizia, Daniel Birmingham, and Renée Harmon


WILLIAM M. TIMPSON, Ph.D., is a professor in the School of Education at Colorado State University (CSU). After receiving his Bachelor’s degree in American History from Harvard University, Bill went on to teach junior and senior high school in the inner city of Cleveland, Ohio before completing a doctoral degree in educational psychology at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Along with numerous articles, chapters, and grants, he has written or coauthored ten other books including Stepping Up: College Learning and Community for a Sustainable Future (2001), 147 Practical Tips for Teaching Diversity (2005), and Conflict, reconciliation, and peace education: Moving Burundi toward a sustainable future (2015).

BRIAN DUNBAR, LEED-Fellow (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design), is director of the Institute for the Built Environment (IBE), and professor emeritus at Colorado State University. Brian is also a leader with CLEAR (Center for Living Environments and Regeneration), a non-profit promoting healthy developments. Brian’s teaching, research, and design charrette facilitation have received numerous local, regional, and national awards.

GAILMARIE KIMMEL, M.Ed., M.A., brings 30 years of experience in community and university education. After participating in the Peace Corps, she staffed Peace and Conflict Studies at University of California at Berkeley and two Oakland churches, cofounded a multidisciplinary think tank, and directed an environmental camp. Currently, she works with the CSU Forest Service, linking sustainable land management with green building and bioenergy, and coordinates the Green Building Certificate Program for CSU’s IBE. She serves on the Board of Directors for the Rocky Mountain Sustainable Living Association and is launching its local living economy project.

BRETT BRUYERE, Ph.D., is director of the CSU Environmental Learning Center (ELC) and assistant professor in the Department of Natural Resource Recreation and Tourism. The ELC provides programs to thousands of students, families, and educators annually about environmental conservation.

PETER NEWMAN, Ph.D., is an assistant professor of protected areas management at the Warner College of Natural Resources at CSU. His research focuses on the human dimensions of natural resources management and visitor “carrying capacity”—i.e., the maximal population load that does not produce negative effects on the environment—in the context of protected areas management. He also has work experience as a National Park Service Ranger in the Division of Resources Management in Yosemite National Park and as a naturalist/instructor for the Yosemite Institute.

HILLARY MIZIA is a sustainability leader and strategist, facilitator, and community connector. She serves the greater community as the principal and founder of PriZm Sustainability and is deepening the Colorado connection as the Executive Director at Shadowcliff Mountain Lodge, a non-profit lodge and retreat center in Grand Lake, CO. She is currently the president of the board at Mountain Sage Community School. She holds a BA in Experiential Education from Prescott College and an MA in Environment and Community from Antioch University, Seattle. She lives life to the fullest in Fort Collins, CO with her family.

DANIEL BIRMINGHAM, Ph.D., is an assistant professor of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) education at Colorado State University. His research examines potential avenues to bridge community and school experiences in order to alter modes of participation in STEM and support transformative learning for youth from traditionally marginalized communities. His work occurs with youth and teachers in traditionally marginalized communities and has resulted in (1) better understanding of science learning experiences that are consequential for youth, (2) examining the ways in which science teachers can learn from experience, expertise, and cultural practices of these youth, and (3) providing insights into an innovative methodological model of youth design-based research.

RENÉE HARMON is a Ph.D. candidate in the School of Education at Colorado State University, research assistant and social media coordinator for CSU’s Africa Center, and an associate professor at National American University. Her research addresses sustainability literacy generally, as well as, teaching and learning sustainability education, in particular. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in Journalism from Western Illinois University, and a Master of Arts in Communication from the University of Missouri—St. Louis. She currently serves on the Northern Colorado Refugee Collaboration Committee in Weld County where she is working on a project to inform the Northern Colorado community about refugee resettlement and to build social relationships between cultures. Renée is also an avid hiker, having completed the Grand Canyons’ Rim-to-Rim-to-Rim hike in 2016.